DEBUNKING WEIGHT LIFTING MYTHS

A lot of women are keen to tone up and use the gym to shape and trim unwanted bulges and flab. But some of us still believe the old myths about weight lifting that keep us from actively trying weights to get the physique we want. Here Heather Marr, Celebrity Fitness Trainer reveals exactly why you need weights to help.

The health benefits

The physical and mental health benefits of weight lifting are well known. From lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and risk of diabetes, to relief of anxiety, stress and depression, we know that weightlifting is good for us, body and mind. Unfortunately, many women still shy away from the weight room due to outdated fitness misinformation.

Muscle

Muscle tissue cannot turn to fat tissue if a person stops exercising. Many women are concerned that if they put on muscle while training that this muscle will turn to fat if they are unable to continue their exercise regime. This is not the case. Muscle cannot turn into fat just as an orange cannot turn into an apple. The muscle would get smaller from not being used.

Also, heavy weight training will not result in large amounts of bulky muscle. You cannot gain large amounts of muscle unless your diet supports it. This would not happen by accident or overnight. It takes years of hard work and dedication with programming and nutrition geared specifically to gain large amounts of muscle. Heavy weight lifting in combination with a smart food plan and cardio will deliver a “toned”, fit, and lean physique.

Feminine curves

Feminine curves will not be lost by weight training. Resistance training actually creates curves and can change proportions. By strategically putting muscle on in certain areas, you’re able to create an hour glass physique, sculpt rounder, shapely glutes and firm, tight upper arms. This is not possible with cardio alone. Cardio when performed alone at its’ best (if additional calories are not being consumed to compensate for the increase in activity) will result in a smaller version of your current physique.